Advances in Dendritic Macromolecules, Volume 2 by George R. Newkome

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Author
George R. Newkome
Publisher
JAI Press
Date of release
Pages
217
ISBN
9781559389396
Binding
Hardcover
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
5
53

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Book review

The series Advances in Dendritic Macromolecules aims to cover the synthetic, as well as chemical, aspects of this expanding field: the chemistry to and supramolecular chemistry of dendritic or cascade supermolecular compounds. In Chapter 1 of this volume, Hawker and Wooley delineate the convergent growth approach to dendrimers, then relate their three-dimensional architectures to different block polymers. In Chapter 2, Moors and Vögtle describe Professor Vögtle's initial cascade molecules via the repetitive strategy, then expand his original concepts of its application by others, and lastly delineate the synthesis of a new series of tosylamide cascades. They also demonstrate the utility of his original Michael addition/reduction procedure by its application to differ cores. Chapter 3, composed by Professor Engel, describes ionic dendrimers which incorporated an internal transition metal center as well as his work based on ammonium and phosphonium centers. In Chapter 4, Mathias and Carothers review recent studies on silicon-based dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers. Chapter 5, by Kim, describes the preparation and utility of hyperbranched aromatic polymers. Lastly in Chapter 6, Escamilla reviews the historical as well as recent examples of ionic and nonionic bolaamphiphiles.


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