Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good: A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005 by Michael Ipgrave

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Author
Michael Ipgrave
Publisher
Georgetown University Press
Date of release
Pages
190
ISBN
9781589012219
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
59

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Building a Better Bridge: Muslims, Christians, and the Common Good: A Record of the Fourth Building Bridges Seminar Held in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, May 15-18, 2005

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Book review

Building a Better Bridge is a record of the fourth "Building Bridges" seminar held in Sarajevo in 2005 as part of an annual symposium on Muslim-Christian relations cosponsored by Georgetown University and the Archbishop of Canterbury. This volume presents the texts of the public lectures with regional presentations on issues of citizenship, religious believing and belonging, and the relationship between government and religion―both from the immediate situation in Bosnia-Herzegovina and from three contexts further afield: Britain, Malaysia, and West Africa.

Both Christian and Muslim scholars propose key questions to be faced in addressing the issue of the common good. How do we approach the civic sphere as believers in particular faiths and as citizens of mixed societies? What makes us who we are, and how do our religious and secular allegiances relate to one another? How do we accommodate our commitment to religious values with acknowledgment of human disagreement, and how can this be expressed in models of governance and justice? How are we, mandated by scriptures to be caretakers, to respond to the current ecological and economic disorder of our world?

Michael Ipgrave and his contributors do not claim to provide definitive answers to these questions, but rather they further a necessary dialogue and show that, while Christian and Islamic understandings of God may differ sharply and perhaps irreducibly, the acknowledgment of one another as people of faith is the surest ground on which to build trust, friendship, and cooperation.


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